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Dell is first to stick Ivy Bridge Xeon E3 chips into servers

Density is the key to power savings
Wed May 09 2012, 12:52

TIN BOX FLOGGER Dell has become the first to announce servers using Intel's latest Ivy Bridge Xeon E3 processors.

Intel launched its single socket Ivy Bridge Xeon E3 processors a month after it wowed everyone with its dual-core Sandy Bridge Xeon E5 processors, and it has taken Dell only another month to announce the first servers to make use of Intel's latest nearline server chip. Dell's Poweredge C5220 microserver uses Xeon E3 1200 series processors that have thermal design power (TDP) down to 17W.

Dell is pitching its Poweredge C5220 servers towards high performance computing, cloud deployments and content delivery networks. While Dell calls the Poweredge C5220 a microserver, that really isn't a reference to its size or density, but rather the fact that it is a single socket server.

Dell offers the Poweredge C5220 with either 17W or 45W TDP Intel processors supporting DDR3-1600 memory. The firm claims close to double the performance over previous generation single socket servers, mainly due to a 50 per cent increase in density.

Intel announced its Ivy Bridge Xeons in April, touting the power savings afforded by the move to the 22nm process node. Intel is pushing its x86 processors into leaner servers, that is, lower power servers that will face stiff competition from ARM-based kit later this year.

Dell said that its Poweredge C5220 servers will go on sale on 22 May with pricing starting at $12,200 for a 3U chassis with eight blade servers, and previous generation models suggest that a 12 blade enclosure is a possibility for the 17W Xeon E3 chips. µ

 

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