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Adobe's Mercury Graphics Engine will support AMD's Trinity APUs

Nvidia's CUDA exclusive is over
Tue Apr 24 2012, 11:45

CHIP DESIGNER AMD has been working with Adobe to bring OpenCL support to the firm's Mercury Graphics Engine.

AMD is set to announce that Adobe's Mercury Graphics Engine will not only support OpenCL but has been optimised for its upcoming Trinity accelerated processor units (APUs). Adobe's Photoshop CS6 and Premiere Pro CS6 that Adobe launched yesterday both feature a revised Mercury Graphics Engine, which now supports OpenCL and OpenGL to provide hardware acceleration on certain effects.

AMD said it has been working with Adobe to push OpenCL support in the firm's Mercury Graphics Engine, which has been given greater emphasis in the latest version of Adobe's Creative Suite. AMD has been an advocate of the OpenCL standard for years, but announcing support in Trinity, a product that has yet to be formally announced shows just how important it is for AMD.

AMD will be claiming that functions such as Blur Gallery will run 10 times faster on Trinity with OpenCL support, while the number of Photoshop CS6 functions that support OpenCL is in the dozens.

For AMD OpenCL support is vital as the firm will not license Nvidia's CUDA for GPGPU, while the wider industry will also see it as further acceptance of the OpenCL open standard. Although Nvidia does support OpenCL, there is no doubt that the firm would have preferred that Adobe and other firms only supported CUDA.

Adobe revealed that only two existing Radeon HD GPUs are formally supported by its Mercury Graphics Acceleration, the Radeon HD 6750M and the Radeon HD 6770M, both of which are used in Apple's Macbook Pro. However AMD will announce that its upcoming Trinity APUs will also gain Adobe's support. µ

 

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