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Lulzsec returns with military dating dump

Infamous hackers reborn
Tue Mar 27 2012, 10:46

A GROUP OF HACKTIVISTS claiming to be Lulzsec Reborn has released a document brimming with addresses that are said to belong to single people that are in the military.

The leak is a wild one, and follows a video posted to Youtube earlier this month that promised a return of the hackers, who amongst other things are mostly arrested.

The earlier video, which most suggested carried no real weight, suggested a return on 1 April, which did not help boost confidence, and anyway its first release has come sooner than that, which again does not help.

"The website http://www.militarysingles.com/ was recently closed day ago or so, so we dumped email db," says the short text that introduces the links to the Notepad document. "Total Dump 170937 Accounts."

We've seen the dump and it is full of names and email addresses, but we cannot confirm if they are real or correct. The dump looks like a Lulzsec release, but anyone with an email and a Pastebin account can claim to be Anonymous.

The Twitter account that is associated with the group, '@lulzsec reborn' is suspended at the moment, we do not know why. Before it was suspended it managed to announce its leak.

The campaign, and the group, does not appear to have gathered much traction among the other Anonymous groups, and none that we can see have recognised the leak. However, this could be a trailer for a planned bigger campaign.

The original Lulzsec carried out a fifty day campaign of virtual mayhem and counted amongst others the Sun newspaper among its scalps. The Military Singles hack could just be the start of Project Mayhem 2012.

We have asked Militarysingles, which is part of Esingles, about the leak. Someone calling themselves an admin from the web site has posted a comment on the Databreaches.net, or the Office of Inadequate Security web site, in which it is claimed that no breach has occurred. µ

 

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