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Samsung will develop its own chips for the Galaxy S III

Bad news for Qualcomm
Tue Mar 20 2012, 12:30

KOREAN HARDWARE SHOP Samsung is preparing to distance itself from Qualcomm's technology by using in-house designed chips in its upcoming Galaxy S III smartphone.

According to a Korean media report, the transition will see Samsung deploy its own single-chip design in the next-generation Galaxy handset.

"Samsung's single-chip solution is a combination of long-term evolution (LTE), telecommunications and W-CDMA functions," a high-ranking company executive told the Korea Times.

He added that Samsung's Exynos-branded quad-core mobile application processors (APs) will be incorporated into the Galaxy S III. "We don't think there will be big technology-related problems as we have already tested our telecommunications chips in some smartphones and tablets for consumers in North America. Also, Google's first reference mobile, the Galaxy Nexus, is using Samsung's telecom chips."

According to the company insider, Samsung is devleloping a "stronger intent to lower its dependence on Qualcomm" and instead rely on its own chips. These will include single-chip logic and memory chips to be used as graphics controllers and core communication chips for smartphones and tablets.

"Samsung is paying huge amounts to Qualcomm in return for using its single-chip solutions in strategic digital devices, however, Qualcomm is gradually losing its edge," another Samsung executive told the Korea Times.

"It was believed that Qualcomm chips had greater stability and suited easy upgrades. But, that's the old story. Our long-term plan is clear. Using Samsung solutions for Samsung products."

Both executives indicated that they wanted their identities kept secret as they were not authorised to brief journalists.

At the time of writing Samsung had not responded to our request for comment. µ

 

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