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Wikimedia leaves Godaddy over SOPA

Foundation was not happy with practices
Mon Mar 12 2012, 09:32

CHARITABLE ORGANISATION The Wikimedia Foundation has parted ways with Godaddy, the domain name registrar that was responsible for hosting its many addresses.

The Wikimedia Foundation has moved off Godaddy's services despite the difficulties involved, because it is not happy with the way the company does business and how it represents itself.

"After months of deliberation and a complicated transfer, the Wikimedia Foundation domain portfolio has been successfully transferred from GoDaddy to MarkMonitor. The portfolio transfer was formally completed on Friday, March 9th, 2012," said Michelle Paulson, legal counsel at Wikimedia.

"The transfers were done seamlessly and our sites did not experience any interruption of service or other issues during the procedure."

According to Paulson months of consideration lead to the decision to drop Godaddy, and Wikimedia carefully considered what other firms would better suit its needs. One of its chief drivers for the move was the firm's early support for the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA).

"As the provider of the 5th most visited web properties in the world, the Foundation cares deeply about who handles our domain names. We had been deliberating a move from GoDaddy for some time - our legal department felt the company was not the best fit for our domain needs - and we began actively seeking other domain management providers in December 2011," added Paulson.

"GoDaddy's initial support of the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), the controversial anti-piracy legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives, reaffirmed our decision to end the relationship."

Having completed its move, the foundation now has its domains with the US firm Markmonitor. µ

 

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