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Nvidia does not support SOPA

But isn't actively opposing it either
Fri Jan 13 2012, 14:42

CHIP DESIGNER Nvidia has spoken up to say that it does not support the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) legislation in the US Congress.

In a company blog post, Bob Sherbin, Nvidia's VP of corporate communications distanced the firm from the Entertainment Software Association (ESA) in its support for SOPA, saying, "NVIDIA wasn’t consulted by ESA in formulating their position on SOPA."

He continued, "Our position is this: we oppose piracy, as it hurts our game-developer partners. However, we do not support SOPA. We don’t believe it is the right solution to the problem. We remain committed to working to address this problem in a constructive and fair manner."

This drew responses from Nvidia fans, with comments falling mainly into two camps. Most people said that not supporting SOPA wasn't nearly enough, and that Nvidia should make its opposition to the legislation completely clear by joining with the IT professional community that is protesting against it.

One commenter wrote, "This is a small step in the right direction. I'm sure that you can be more vocal about opposing #SOPA and #PIPA. It would be a big step if you joined others in their protest against #SOPA." This was echoed by others, one of whom said, "Not supporting SOPA is still a far cry from opposing it. Please oppose SOPA actively and publicly!"

Another said, "You need to oppose SOPA. As a tech company I find it [hard] to believe that you don't know the damage SOPA will cause, not least of all to DNSSEC. Simply saying you were not consulted by the ESA is not enough. You should be outraged that they made a stance on your behalf without consulting you as well. You should consider publicly scolding them and even removing yourself from the organization. What you have said does NOT go far enough."

However, a few other commenters said that Nvidia declaring its lack of support for SOPA was clear enough. µ

 

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