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Lenovo announces its Thinkpad T430u Ultrabook laptop

With a reasonable starting price
Thu Jan 05 2012, 05:00

CHINESE PC MAKER Lenovo has announced its next Ultrabook class laptop prior to next week's consumer electronics show (CES) in Las Vegas.

The T430u Ultrabook is Lenovo's follow-on to the U300s, which it announced in September. The T430u will be on show at CES next week and will be available in the third quarter in the UK with a starting price of £545.

Lenovo ThinkPad T430u ultrabook

"The T430u Ultrabook represents the next generation in thin and light computing," said Dilip Bhatia, vice president of Thinkpad at Lenovo. "From small businesses that literally live their life on the road to corporate professionals working in a managed environment, these new crossover laptops fundamentally change the way people think about mobile computing technology."

Like all Ultrabooks the laptop will come in a slim and light design at 20.3mm thick and less than 1.8kg. It will have a matte finish with an aluminium cover and will be available with a 14in high definition screen.

The T430u will come with an unknown Intel processor. The words "third generation" were mentioned in the pre-CES briefing we attended but Lenovo has not confirmed whether its Ultrabook or other laptops will have Sandy Bridge or Ivy Bridge processors. The latter seems more likely.

It will come with an optional Nvidia graphics card and up to 1TB of disk storage or a solid state disk (SSD). Lenovo touts a battery life of up to six hours and features such as quick resume and fast boot. It will also be the first Ultrabook with a DVD drive according to the firm.

The Lenovo T430u will have to compete with other recent entries to the Ultrabook category such as Toshiba's Z830 and Asus' Zenbook UX31E. We expect Ultrabooks to make a large showing at this year's CES. µ

 

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