The Inquirer-Home

Anonymous threatens US government over alleged internet censorship

Calls on people to protest
Mon Nov 21 2011, 14:52

HACKTIVIST GROUP Anonymous has threatened to fight the US government over alleged censorship of the internet.

In a recent pastebin post the group claims that the US government "is censoring the internet", employing ISP blocks, DNS blocks, search engine and web site censorship, and a variety of other methods to stifle freedom.

Anonymous has called on the citizens of the US to stand up against their government in what it described as "not a call to arms, but a call to recognition and action". It also called on the people of other countries to "fight back", adding that their governments will most likely follow suit.

Anonymous said that the US is often cited as an example of the ideal free country, but that the government has given people "a false sense of freedom". It compared the situation to the censorship in countries like Egypt and Libya, highlighting the revolutions that followed, and suggesting that the US is not exempt from similar action.

Anonymous has targeted many government web sites before, including those of Algeria, Chile, Colombia, Egypt, Iran, Libya, New Zealand, Syria and El Salvador. If it carries out its threats we will likely see attacks on US web sites in the near future, including the one belonging to the White House.

However, the fight against censorship is likely to involve more than a Distributed Denial of Service attack or web site defacement. Anonymous called on people to make an internet and physical protest against their governments, similar to the Occupy protests around the world.

"This affects anyone that desires the freedom to browse anonymously, speak freely without fear of retribution, or protest without fear of arrest," Anonymous said.

The group has asked people to spread the word to everyone they know, via IRC chat, social networks, and any other kind of online and real life community, in hopes that the US government will change its policies when it sees the large public outcry.

Anonymous also threatened to use alternative methods if protest is not enough, but did not specify what these might be. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Microsoft's Windows 10 Preview has permission to watch your every move

Does Microsoft have the right to keylog users of its Windows 10 Technical Preview?