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Qualcomm launches eight Snapdragon S4 chips

No mention of devices just yet
Thu Nov 17 2011, 13:07

CHIP DESIGNER Qualcomm has announced a slew of Krait-based Snapdragon system-on-chip (SoC) processors to fit in its S1 and S4 performance classes.

Qualcomm's Snapdragon range of SoC chips have proven to be extremely popular in smartphones and tablets, however the firm is facing a growing challenge from Texas Instruments and Nvidia. Coming little over a week after Nvidia revealed its quad-core Tegra 3 processor, Qualcomm has announced eight Snapdragon S4 processors and four Snapdragon S1 processors.

Since Qualcomm showed off the Krait architecture in February with three chips, the firm has not extended its headline S4 range of processors. Now it has added eight SKUs, with models including the MSM8660A, MSM8260A, MSM8630, MSM8230, MSM8627, MSM8227, APQ8060A and APQ8030. Qualcomm was cagey about when devices sporting these chips will appear, only mentioning an early 2012 timeframe.

Perhaps more important for Qualcomm's sales figures are its entry level Snapdragon S1 chips. The four new chips in this category are the MSM7225A, MSM7625A, MSM7227A and MSM7627A models, with the firm claiming that they have been optimised for those OEM customers that are making the transition from 2G to 3G devices.

Qualcomm's glut of new Snapdragon SKUs is timed nicely with CES less than two months away and Mobile World Congress a month after that. The new S4 chips will end up in a number of headline grabbing devices, however the company should have taken a leaf from Nvidia's book and teamed up with a device partner to showcase a headline device early.

Instead, Qualcomm gave no indications of what target devices will look like, how well they will perform or even how much they will cost. µ

 

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