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Intel has 80 per cent of the microprocessor market

While AMD has lost a little market share
Thu Nov 03 2011, 11:56

CHIPMAKER Intel is still leading the microprocessor revenues tables, according to the latest figures from analyst house International Data Corp (IDC).

Intel has over 80 per cent of a market that it worth $10.7bn a quarter, reports IDC. Revenues in the quarter rose by 12 per cent compared with the same time last year, while shipments increased by 5 per cent. Average selling prices to OEMs grew as well.

Selling prices were in part driven up by the release of Intel Sandy Bridge and AMD Fusion microprocessors, added the firm.

"It was the eighth quarter in a row that ASPs rose. Clearly, Intel's Sandy Bridge and AMD's Fusion microprocessors with integrated graphic processors are rising in each company's product stack and driving the price increase," said Shane Rau, director of Semiconductors Personal Computing research at IDC.

"At the same time, low-end processors, notably Intel's Atom processors, are declining as a percentage of the unit mix."

Intel had 80.2 per cent of worldwide unit market share in the third quarter, a small gain of just under one percent against the same time last year. AMD meanwhile saw its share fall by around the same amount to 19.7 per cent.

In desktop chips the difference is more notable, and while Intel grew its share by just under five per cent to around 76 per cent, AMD fell by about the same margin to a 24.1 per cent market share.

AMD does better in mobile PC processors and gained 2.4 per cent, giving it 17.6 per cent of the market while Intel fell by 2.1 per cent to 82.3 per cent. In the PC server and workstation processors market Intel has a 95.1 per cent market share and AMD 4.9 per cent. µ

 

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