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Google adds an ‘Ignore’ button to Google+

About time, too
Fri Aug 26 2011, 09:15

INTERNET SEARCH GIANT Google has added an 'Ignore' button to its Google+ social networking service, letting users shun gasbags and people that they just don't like.

Google announced the addition on Google+, of course, and the firm gave it the spin of clearing up clutter on its social networking feed and letting you focus on only those posters who interest you. This seems counter to the vapid premises of social networking, but we can understand the rationale.

"We want to make sure you can represent your real-life relationships on Google+ -- whether you want to connect with someone or not :-) So starting today, we're rolling out a new option to Ignore people, in addition to the existing (and stronger) option to Block them," wrote Google+ engineer Olga Wichrowska as she explained that you can do this without hurting anyone's feelings.

"Ignore means you'll see less of what a person is sharing (i.e., you're just not interested). Block additionally limits the ways a person can interact with what you're sharing (i.e., you don't want anything to do with them). And in either case, we don't notify the person that you've ignored or blocked them."

Google added another filter to Google+, a tweak to the notifications you get when someone adds you, or when you have added them.

"We think it feels very different to get a notification when someone adds you to a circle and when someone you already have in a circle adds you back," added Wichrowska.

"So we're splitting this up into two different kinds of notifications: Added you on Google+ and Added you back on Google+. We're making this change in the Notifications menu and on the 'view all' Notifications page." µ

 

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