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Defcon hackers get hacked over 4G

Anonymous and Lulzsec unleash a beast at the security conference
Thu Aug 11 2011, 09:38

HACKERS AT DEFCON 19 were given a taste of their own medicine by pranksters from Anonymous and Lulzsec, according to a recent posting on the Seclists security disclosure web site.

The security conference that took place last week is a way for hackers and crackers to show off new techniques and flaws and flex their collective muscles, but it seems that a less than obvious experiment was also taking place.

"While most were enjoying libations or talks a very interesting event was taking place at the conference. We're all familiar with the hostility of WiFi and GSM networks at DEF CON, however, this year the most hostile network on earth was not 802.11; it was CDMA and 4G!," reads the introduction to the disclosure made by a poster called Coderman.

"On Friday some parts of Anon and Lulz made appearance. By early Saturday morning a weapon was deployed."

The weapon, which was also described as a beast, was pretty effective by all accounts and presumably fooled all those it touched, despite some rather obvious tells.

The system used easy and already tried attacks according to the poster, who defended them in comments. However, he added that when these were exhausted other, more devious and inventive methods were employed.

The beast operated continuously, except for some outages from Saturday morning until the following Monday, and was designed for less than savoury activities like eavesdropping and mass exploitation.

If you were there and are wondering if you picked it up, there is one very easy way to find out, and we'll leave it to Coderman to tell you what that is.

"Did you accept an upgrade for Android, Java, or other applications? (oops)".

The implications for the attack appear significant and could, according to at least one interested party, enable a denial of service attack over a 4G network. µ

 

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