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HP lowers Touchpad price in US to undercut the Ipad 2

Needs an edge to beat Apple
Mon Aug 08 2011, 14:50

FLOGGER OF EXPENSIVE PRINTER INK HP has slashed the price of its Touchpad in the US as it tries to compete against Apple's Ipad 2.

HP launched its first WebOS tablet a month ago amid much fanfare and while the hardware specifications are comparable, the firm initially priced the Touchpad to match Apple's Ipad 2. While the reviews of the Touchpad were good, the problem for all tablets competing against Apple's device is that not only do they have to be at least as good as the Ipad, they need to be less expensive too, which is something that HP apparently has now realised.

Over in the US, HP has dropped the price of a 16GB Touchpad to $450 with the 32GB version costing $550, which is $50 less than its Apple counterpart. There have been whisperings that sales of the Touchpad have been low and while a price cut is always welcome, one wonders whether a 10 per cent price difference will be enough to entice punters away from the Ipad 2.

At the moment UK retailers are still sticking to the £399 price tag for the 16GB Touchpad, while a retailer going through Amazon is offering a 32GB Touchpad for £422, though most other places price the 32GB unit up around £480.

When The INQUIRER played around with the Touchpad last month we liked its performance but baulked at its relatively meagre application catalogue and physical characteristics. However, users are reporting improvements to WebOS since HP released an over-the-air update on 1 August.

HP might want to consider bundling in a Pre 3 in the future if it wants to have a hope of taking a bite out of Apple's considerable tablet market share. Otherwise there might be a chance that the Touchpad, despite its capabilities, will end up forgotten. µ

 

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