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Avaya shows a voice and video over IP Android tablet

More than a shiny drinks tray
Thu Jul 28 2011, 11:26
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TELECOMS VENDOR Avaya has shown off its Desktop Video Device (ADVD), an Android tablet that runs its Flare voice and video over IP software client.

Avaya's custom Android tablet has an 11.6in display with 1366x768 resolution and runs Android 2.2, and it is perhaps the first custom built tablet meant specifically for businesses. Avaya's Flare software enables voice and video over IP through the company's Flare backend infrastructure.

Playing around with the ADVD, it seemed more like a showcase product for Avaya to highlight what its Flare application can do. Integration with the firm's backend Session Manager application and third party services such as Facebook, Microsoft Exchange and Lync was slick.

The firm was also keen to stress that it is a standard Android tablet, however given the size and weight of the device it is unlikely many will want to carry it around all day. There is no shortage of connectivity options though, with three USB ports, HDMI output, Ethernet, Bluetooth and headphone and microphone jacks.

Avaya confirmed that the tablet has access to the Android Market and it is encouraging developers to make specific addons for Flare, such as call logging for billing.

Avaya was keen to point out that it doesn't expect the ADVD to compete with Apple's Ipad or other tablets and is working on getting the Flare software onto Apple's App Store, which the firm says will happen at by year end. The reason that Avaya seems to be cautious about predicting sales of the ADVD could be because its list price is $3,200, which makes Apple's overpriced shiny drinks tray seem like a bargain.

Price aside, because as Avaya admitted, most people will probably use its software on an Ipad, the ADVD and in particular the Flare software shows that tablets might finally have a real use in business apart from adding trendy cachét and aesthetic value. µ

 

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