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Last.fm database server goes gaga

The day the music died
Mon Jul 18 2011, 13:40

MUSIC STREAMING SERVICE Last.fm is having a manic Monday thanks to its database server going down.

Last.fm has said that since 04:00 GMT its Rabd service has been "exhibiting intermittent problems meeting acceptable service levels" according to Colin Strickland at Last.fm. Radb is the service that powers pretty much everything on Last.fm including song recommendations made to listeners.

According to Strickland, with Radb down it means that the service's scrobbles - the term given to Last.fm's tracking of songs being played and associated data such as libraries, charts and neighbourhoods are all offline. The firm has also stopped accepting new scrobbles, the valuable bits of data that help it make recommendations and more importantly build up advertising information.

Strickland also commented that the firm is not sure why its core backend service is having these problems. Apparently Last.fm's backup Radb service is not up to the job and so the firm pulled the plug on a number of key services. "To remove as much stress as we can from the database service layer, we have additionally disabled most of our radio, library and recommendation services, temporarily," said Strickland.

Twitter is awash with users complaining about Last.fm's downtime, however the firm's operations team announced in the past half hour that its radio services are "gradually restarting" but that library servers are still down.

In a bid to break the sound of silence, we tried to listen to some of the Last.fm radios and had a hit and miss experience. Curiously, the first song we were served up was Depeche Mode's Enjoy the Silence. µ

 

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