The Inquirer-Home

Google+ gets a C- for capacity

It's an exclusive club until further notice
Thu Jun 30 2011, 17:02

INTERNET SEARCH GIANT Google has launched its Google+ social networking web site but it won't permit new users to sign up.

In an attempt the knock Facebook of its social networking perch, Google launched Google+ yesterday. It's available via the Android market or online but don't bother wasting your time trying to sign up because you can't sign up even if you've had an invitation.

We've had an invite at The INQUIRER, not from Google though, but we can't sign up because the Google+ web site says, "Already invited? We've temporarily exceeded our capacity. Please try again soon."

"Right now, we're testing with a small number of people, but it won't be long before the Google+ project is ready for everyone."

In a statement, Google told The INQUIRER, "We are not sharing exact numbers on the size of the trial or who we invited. There will be enough testers involved to provide comprehensive, real-world data about how people use the product."

The web site aims to defeat the goliath of social networking, Facebook, with a combination of different areas. These include '+Circles' for different groups of friends, '+Sparks' for sharing content and '+Hangouts' for, er, hanging out.

Google got badly burned with its previous attempt at social networking with Buzz and had to pay $8.5m to settle a law suit over alleged privacy violations. It's obviously being much more careful with the design and testing of Google+ to avoid having such a mishap again.

That doesn't stop people from getting annoying at being told they're not allowed to sign up, though. We personally feel left out and our feelings are a bit hurt, like the kid at school who gets picked last for the football team. µ

 

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