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Justin Timberlake wants to bring Sexyback to Myspace

Part of $35m Specific Media deal for the music site
Thu Jun 30 2011, 13:58

STRUGGLING MUSIC SHARING WEB SITE Myspace has finally found a buyer in digital music firm Specific Media.

The deal is reportedly worth about $35m, just a slight drop then, from the $580m News Corp paid for the social networking web site back in 2005.

Justin Timberlake (Photo - Caroline Bonarde Ucci)Here at The INQUIRER, we're about as interested in what happens to ailing Myspace as when we found out that Samsung was launching a Google Chromebook. But then we heard that none other than ex-boy band member Justin Timberlake has joined the outfit as part of the deal, investing his own money into it, as well as taking on a creative and strategic role.

The move comes hot on the heels of JT playing Napster founder and Facebook investor Sean Parker in The Social Network, a film loosely based on the launch of the Myspace rival Facebook.

This is a clear case of the life imitating art trap beloved of so many celebrities. Just as actors think they've actually exposed government corruption or found a cure for some terrible illness after playing that role - think Rachel Weisz' Oscar acceptance speech for the Constant Gardener - Timberlake seems to think he has acquired the necessary business acumen and social networks savvy from learning some lines that Parker probably didn't really say anyway.

"Art is inspired by people and vice versa, so there's a natural social component to entertainment," gushed JT.

"I'm excited to help revitalise Myspace by using its social media platform to bring artists and fans together in one community."

The grand scheme is to evolve Myspace into "the premiere digital destination for original shows, video content and music". Shame that the BBC Iplayer, Youtube and Spotify have all cemented their place in those areas already.

Looks like Justin will be crying a river yet again. Maybe Rupert Murdoch will be able to lend him a spare handkerchief. µ

 

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