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Anonymous hacks Anguilla, Brazil, Zimbabwe and Australia governments

Taking over from Lulzsec
Tue Jun 28 2011, 12:11

HACKTIVIST GROUP Anonymous has taken over from Lulzsec, targeting the government servers of Anguilla, Brazil, Zimbabwe and Australia.

Lulzsec and Anonymous launched Operation Anti-Security a week ago with the aim of attacking high profile targets like banks and governments. Lulzsec disbanded over the weekend, ending a 50 day spate of attacks, but Anonymous is filling that void by releasing a number of payloads today.

The first is government data from Anguilla. The second is passwords for Brazillian government servers. The third is the user base for the Zimbabwe government, with Anonymous claiming it gained access to everything on all gov.zw servers. The last revelation is data from the Mosman Council in Sydney, Australia.

The files were uploaded to the file host service Mediafire, where they are still accessible. Anonymous promised to upload a torrent with all of the data tomorrow, along with "some surprises".

Unlike Lulzsec, which appeared to have no motive beyond having a laugh, Anonymous claims its attacks are a form of protest against repressive regimes, censorship and other obstructions of justice. It slated many goverments, claiming they "do not even bother to stay within the law themselves".

Anonymous has been relatively quiet while Lulzsec gained attention around the world over the past two months, but now it looks set to regain the limelight. It will likely also regain attention from law enforcement agencies, as government hacks make Anonymous a significant threat. It joked "arrest us finally", but with the arrest and charging of alleged Lulzsec hacker Ryan Cleary, this possibility might be weighing heavily on some hackers' minds.

This does not look to be the last of the attacks, as Anonymous commented, "we have some major US companies left". If that was not worrying enough for American firms, it added, "the best is yet to come". µ

 

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