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Goatse hacker pleads guilty to Ipad attack

Daniel Spitler confesses to ID theft and unauthorised computer access
Fri Jun 24 2011, 11:20

A COMPUTER HACKER who contributed to malicious code used in an attack on AT&T's servers to steal Ipad user information, has pleaded guilty to US federal charges.

Daniel Spitler, who the Newark, New Jersey US attorney's office alleged is associated with the Goatse hacker group, admitted conspiring to hack into the servers, steal information regarding Ipad subscribers, and publicise the crime, according to a statement from US attorney Paul Fishman.

Spitler, who is 26, pleaded guilty to charges including one count of conspiracy to gain unauthorised access to computers connected to the internet and one count of identity theft. This is an advance from the single conspiracy count he was initially charged with after he surrendered himself to law enforcement in January of this year.

At the time prosecutors said that Goatse Security was a group of "self-professed Internet 'trolls'" who tried to disrupt online content and services. What? With a name like that?

Now though things have moved on from mere 'trolls' to a more competent set of hackers, which of course, is the Antisec movement, and fittingly US attorney Fishman reached into his back pocket and sprinkled his statement with a dose of paranoia.

"Computer hackers are exacting an increasing toll on our society, damaging individuals and organizations to gain notoriety for themselves," said US attorney Fishman, who took the opportunity to remind people that there are evil, scary hackers out there.

"Hacks have serious implications - from the personal devastation of a stolen identity to danger to our national security. In the wake of other recent hacking attacks by loose-knit organizations like Anonymous and LulzSec, Daniel Spitler's guilty plea is a timely reminder of the consequences of treating criminal activity as a competitive sport."

Spitler's charges each carry a maximum potential penalty of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Sentencing, which could just depend on the whim of the judge, is currently scheduled for September 28, 2011.

It's possible that Anonymous and Lulzsec might lead a merry chase, but the stakes appear to be high. µ

 

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