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Passwords leaked by Lulzsec were from Writerspace

Web site confesses to 12,000 out of the 62,000 details leaked
Fri Jun 17 2011, 10:15

THE LATEST LULZSEC HACK compromised email addresses and passwords belonging to users of Writerspace, according to a statement on the web site.

Revealed yesterday, the attack saw Lulzsec release a text document including a list of usernames and passwords. No other information was given and it was up to those who downloaded the booty to work out what web sites the passwords applied to.

Twitter, typically, was full of posts from downloaders claiming access to accounts ranging to Facebook and Twitter all the way up the more top shelf online properties.

Writerspace too was affected, and according to a post on the website the list included the details for 12,000 of its users.

"Today an anonymous group of hackers known as LulzSec posted a list of 62,000 e-mail addresses and passwords. That list included about 12,000 e-mail addresses and passwords from Writerspace members," said a statement on the web site.

"We are in the process of contacting all members impacted by the attack, and we sincerely regret the inconvenience this may cause any of our site members. We want to assure our readers that we take our responsibility for protecting your personal information very seriously."

The firm is smarting from the attack and has promised that it is doing all that it can to fix its systems and ensure that they are as secure as possible.

"Unfortunately, there are people who make it their mission to find and exploit any vulnerability no matter how secure the system. Today's email list was posted by the same group that hacked the CIA website earlier in the week and the US Senate website last week," it added.

"Our techs are working to insure that our server is as secure as possible." µ

 

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