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Digital Storm unveils a line of pre-built gaming PCs

Ready made PCs for gamers with lots of cash
Wed May 25 2011, 13:16

BESPOKE GAMING PC VENDOR Digital Storm has announced some pre-built systems for gamers loaded with cash.

Like Voodoo PC before HP bought it out, Digital Storm has a reputation for building very expensive niche gaming PCs for dedicated, and rich, gaming fans. Now the boutique vendor has announced a less expensive line of off the shelf Ode gaming PCs.

Let's face it though, there no such thing as decent inexpensive gaming PC, so Digital Storm doesn't build anything for less than $1,499 for its new Ode range. The company has four lines to choose from and, taking a pitch from McDonalds' marketing, there's no such thing as small on offer. The first PC is simply called Good and costs $1,499 (£923), the next level is Better at $1,999 (£1,231), then Best at $2,299 (£1,415). How can you get better than best? You go with the Ultimate for $2,499 (£1,538).

All things are relative and for a gaming system those are not too expensive, considering that bespoke PCs start at around £2,000 for system melting over-clocked specifications. Digital Storm's cheapest PC has an Intel Core I7 2600K chip rated at 3.40GHz and unlocked for over-clocking. There's also 8GB of Corsair's XMS3 Series memory, 1TB of storage and the over-clocked edition of an Nvidia 1GB Geforce GTX560 video card.

The most expensive Ultimate model has the same CPU and Corsair memory, but it has an 850W power supply, 1TB of storage, a 120GB SSD drive and two 1.2GB Nvidia Geforce GTX570 video cards set up in SLI mode.

If Digital Storm does well from its new line of pre-built gaming PCs we wonder how long it will be before a top tier PC vendor will show an interest in the hope of emulating HP's buyout of Voodoo PC and Dell's acquisition of Alienware. µ

 

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