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Red Hat launches Openshift 'platform as a service'

Broad selections of languages, frameworks and cloud providers are available
Thu May 05 2011, 13:03

LEADING LINUX BRAND Red Hat has launched Openshift, a 'platform-as-a-service' (PaaS) for open source developers.

The online service is intended to give open source developers a broad base upon which to work on cloud development, without the traditional restrictions of other PaaS products.

Openshift includes support for a wide range of programming languages, including Java, Python, PHP and Ruby via the Spring, Seam, Weld, CDI, Rails, Rack, Symfony, Zend, Framework, Twisted, Django and Java EE frameworks, making it one of the most comprehensive PaaS offerings on the market. There are also plans to add further support for Java EE 6.

There is additional support in the form of other Red Hat and Jboss services, such as MongoDB and Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The service also includes SQL and NoSQL data stores and a distributed file system.

Red Hat is keeping the service open by not restricting which cloud provider users want to run Openshift on, unlike many other PaaS offerings. It is built on the Deltacloud cloud interoperability standard, ensuring that it will work with any Red Hat Certified Public Cloud Provider, which include Amazon's EC2 as well as IBM, Fujitsu and Savvis clouds.

Enterprise support is also available via Red Hat's Jboss Enterprise Middleware and the company's operating system and virtualisation products. Red Hat said Openshift is a good 'on-ramp' to the cloud for enterprise developers.

Red Hat claimed that Openshift is the dream cloud service, since it offers the innovation and choice that open source developers are looking for. It's hard to fault it for its extensive selection of languages, frameworks and cloud providers, which sounds like a perfect match for eclectic enterprise developers. µ

 

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