The Inquirer-Home

Sony wants to hire 'anti-piracy' attack dogs

PS3 hacker says legal battle is pointless
Wed Feb 23 2011, 11:31

OVERBEARING JAPANESE COMPANY Sony's battle against copyright infringement continues with a job posting on the Sony Computer Entertainment America (SCEA) website looking for two 'anti-piracy' legal eagles.

Sony is seeking to hire a senior corporate counsel and a senior paralegal for its so-called 'anti-piracy' programme, who will work with Sony Computer Entertainment, Sony Corporation and the videogame industry's Entertainment Software Association.

The job descriptions for both roles say, "Assist in supporting anti-piracy civil lawsuits and providing support to law enforcement intellectual property agencies on behalf of SCEA."

It follows Sony's hard line stance against Playstation 3 hackers, which said that anyone running unauthorised or 'pirated' software will be permanently banned.

Among its targets is George Hotz, who is famed for hacking the PS3 and is in the process of getting funding for a legal battle with Sony.

He said on his blog, "I see a lot of parallels with the 'War on Drugs'. Most people, me included, admit drugs are a problem, but this whole idea of tackling it with the legal system has never worked and will never work."

"When you shut down a piracy ring... another pops up, and content remains just as free. Sometimes a drug user is made an example of."

"Does everyone put down the crack pipe? Of course not. Sometimes a college student who downloaded 30 songs is made an example of. Does everyone run to the nearest Tower Records? Of course not."

He concluded, "This is not a battle that can be won in the courts. The pirates and the drug smugglers will always be one step ahead, the only way to beat them is to think outside the box. And the legal system is as inside the box as you can think." µ

 

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