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Blighty is pants for broadband

State of the Internet report claims we are no longer Great Britain
Tue Jan 25 2011, 11:49

CLOUD OUTFIT Akamai Technologies says that British broadband is falling behind the rest of the world in the broadband race.

In its third quarter 2010 State of the Internet report the outfit snuffled around its global server network to look at things like broadband adoption, mobile connectivity and attack traffic, as well as trends over time.

The report showed that more than 533 million unique IP addresses were created from 235 countries or regions connected to the Akamai network.

This represents 6.6 per cent more IP addresses than it found during the second quarter of 2010 and 20 per cent more than the same quarter a year ago.

All of the countries in the top 10 saw quarterly growth, with South Korea's 11 per cent increase leading the pack.

Annual growth was strong as well, with seven of the top 10 countries experiencing double digit percentage increases. Notably, China grew by over 30 per cent in the last year, adding approximately 15 million unique IP addresses.

But generally the report said things were pretty grim in the UK. Not only did the country see an 80 percent increase in attack traffic from known mobile network providers, it failed to see much interesting growth at all.

A mobile provider in Russia took the top spot for the highest average connection speed among the known mobile network providers, reaching nearly 6Mbps.

A telco in Slovakia has again topped the list with an average peak connection speed of nearly 23Mbps, gaining approximately 2.5Mbps from the second quarter.

All of the fastest connection speeds globally were recorded by the likes of Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Hong Kong and Romania.

It is probably time for another wave of immigration from Blighty. It does not seem as if the place has much going for it anymore. µ

 

 

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