The Inquirer-Home

AMD launches embedded Fusion chips

DirectX 11 for less power
Wed Jan 19 2011, 13:01

CHIP DESIGNER AMD has released its G-series of embedded processors, the first based on its Fusion technology.

amd-embeddedAMD drip-fed information on the latest incarnation of its Fusion chip technology that it calls an accelerated processing unit (APU) last year, showing laptops running the chips. Now Chimpzilla is aiming for the embedded market. The APU designs combine a CPU, a graphics processor and a memory controller into a single chip, allowing for significant power savings that are vital in embedded processors.

Although Fusion is well suited to low cost and thin-and-light laptops, the firm is pitching its Fusion APUs based on the Bobcat core at the lucrative, high volume embedded market by claiming the chips have "more compute capabilities on a single die than any processor in the history of computing" and that "no solution with this level of advanced computing is available for the embedded market today". It's safe to say that AMD is certainly not holding back on the marketing hyperbole.

AMD's 64-bit G-series chips come in single and dual core varieties with clock speeds of up to 1.6GHz. There's a 1MB Level 2 cache and the graphics core supports Microsoft's DirectX 11. The memory controller supports both DDR3-800 and DDR3-1066 and two modules. The cost of all this logic is a thermal design power of 9W or 18W for single and dual core versions, respectively.

To coincide with the launch, AMD lined up a couple of its partners to acclaim its latest creation, with Fujitsu saying that it was "extremely satisfied" with the results with AMD's latest chip when put into extreme temperature conditions.

AMD did not announce that any of its consumer motherboard partners are producing Mini-ITX designs based on its G-series of chips, however it will be surprising if vendors such as Asus, Gigabyte and Jetway all ignore AMD's latest embedded chips. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Microsoft's Windows 10 Preview has permission to watch your every move

Does Microsoft have the right to keylog users of its Windows 10 Technical Preview?