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Assange's extradition hearing is on 7 February, bail conditions reduced

Swedes abused the process, says his lawyer
Tue Jan 11 2011, 17:21

NO LONGER electronically tagged, Wikileaks founder Julian Assange promised more revelations as his lawyers laid out his defence.

At today's case management hearing Assange had his bail conditions relaxed including the end of electronic tagging. He will also be allowed to stay in London during the two day extradition hearing that will start on 7 February.

Assange's lawyers laid out his defence for the 7 February hearing in skeleton form after the court session and, thanks to certain US politicians and others in the US talking about having the Wikileaks founder assassinated, it seems to be a good one.

In a nutshell Assange should not be extradited to Sweden because the Swedish prosecutor's office has abused the legal extradition process, both Sweden's own and the UK's.

The Swedish public prosecutor's office is not authorised to carry out extraditions for the purpose of investigations. Extraditions are for prosecution not questioning, which is what the Swedish authorities say they want him for.

Sweden's prosecutors had the chance to talk with their suspect when he was in their country, but they didn't.

And any extradition or rendition of Assange from Sweden to the USA could see him at risk of the death penalty or harm in US custody, even in that pit of torture, Guantanamo Bay.

One imagines that, with regard to the rendition argument, Wikileaks has a few documents up its sleaves to show how ready Sweden is to do this.

As he was leaving court, The Guardian reports that Assange said, "Our work with WikiLeaks continues unabated and we are stepping up our publishing of materials related to cablegate." µ

 

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