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Anonymous takes down record industry websites

Avenging The Pirate Bay Four
Mon Nov 29 2010, 16:17

FOLLOWING the mixed result of an appeal by the founders of The Pirate Bay, the online vigilante group Anonymous has taken down the website of the International Federation of Phonographic Industry (IFPI).

On Friday, the Swedish Appeals Court reduced the jail sentences of The Pirate Bay Four, however it increased the damage award to £4.2 million.

Not long after Anonymous issued a call to arms against the "IFPI, MAFIAA and other parasites". The IFPI, headquartered in London, lobbies on behalf of the big four record labels and claims to represent the interests of recording artists.

As part of Operation Payback, Anonymous claimed the verdict "marked perhaps one of the most heinous of crimes against freedom" and said "this travesty of injustice perpetrated by media conglomerates is an abomination against society". The statement continued by saying the group was angry and that it will "no longer take orders from oldfags [sic] dictating what we can and cannot do".

Sure enough the IFPI website has been taken offline. At press time it is still offline, though we believe that few will think that its temporary demise is a great loss to the Internet.

Anonymous' vowed to keep the IFPI and other music cartel network administrators busy in the future. "We will continue to attack websites of those who are a danger to freedom on the internet. We will continue to attack those who embrace censorship," the group said in the statement.

On Sunday Anonymous also took down Warner Brothers' website, saying that it "didn't want IFPI to feel singled out".

All that remains is for Anonymous to decide on which 'parasite' to take off the Internet next. µ

 

 

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