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Apple takes Adobe Flash off Macs

Airheads
Mon Oct 25 2010, 11:58

THE VENDOR OF SHINY TOYS, Apple has thrown the baby out with the bathwater by not pre-installing Flash on Macs.

Adobe Flash, the second most popular web video format according to Steve Jobs, has been taken off Apple hardware to keep its Dear Leader happy. Apple has already banned Flash on the Iphone and Ipad after Jobs reacted to Adobe's claims that the company was locking down its own walled garden.

Apple's closed approach to technology is something that Google and RIM have attacked after Jobs's reality distorting claims. Jobs said open source Android wasn't actually open and RIM's Playbook tablet would be dead on arrival. Oh, and of course, HTML5 is already the most popular and dominant web video format.

Now Apple has also lashed out at Flash for not being efficient enough. Apple's control freakery and restrictive policy has led the company to try to ban Flash-based apps from its tight-leashed developers. US regulators put a stop to that, so Apple responded with a knee-jerk sulk that has seen the company take Flash off its new Macbook Air pancake laptop.

Apple at least has enough of a grasp of reality to realise that banning Flash might get it in trouble again. But Job has done everything he can to make sure Adobe is given a rough time. According to Reuters, Flash can be downloaded onto the Macbook Air, but it is not pre-installed.

Apple executive Bill Evans released a statement that points to the problem Adobe has keeping Flash bug-free, hence the "frequent updates."

"We're happy to continue to support Flash on the Mac and the best way for users to always have the most up to date and secure version is to download it directly from Adobe," he said.

We reported that Apple has already built total control into the hardware elements of the Macbook Air, with most of the parts superglued onto the mainboard so only Apple's repair angels can fix them, for a hefty fee. Now Apple apparently wants to exert just as much control over the software experience. µ

 

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