The Inquirer-Home

Consumer watchdog lambasts Apple's Iphone 4 rubber band program

Rubs it in
Tue Sep 14 2010, 12:59

SWEEPING MATTERS under the rug only works if everyone forgets about it, but for Iphone 4 antennagate it seems that Consumer Reports isn't nearly ready to let Apple forget it.

iphone-4-in-handAs Apple wraps up its free rubber band giveaway, the US consumer product testing magazine Consumer Reports has come out and fired another salvo at the fruit themed toymaker by repeating its recommendation not to buy the Iphone 4. The outfit also denounced the 'new' rubber band program, charging that it is "less consumer-friendly in several respects".

Apple CEO and cult leader Steve Jobs offered customers a selection of cases in order to overcome the faulty design of the Iphone 4 antenna. Since then, the cappuccino company has laid the groundwork for withdrawing its offer by claiming that the number of those customers affected by the problem was "even smaller than we originally thought".

Not everyone is buying the claim just because it comes from Saint Steve's hallowed cathedral of technological vanity. Consumer Reports rightly questioned Apple's claim, saying, "Apple provided no data to detail its claim of lower-than-expected incidence of dropped calls with the iPhone 4."

Because Apple knows that the problem won't suddenly disappear after the current free rubber band program ends, it announced that customers can still receive a free Apple rubber band, marketed as a Bumper. Unlike the current program, users will have to write to Apple and plead that they need a Bumper instead of Apple offering one.

It's quite an impressive feat by Jobs' Mob. Why not get the faithful to go out of their way to fix a fundamental design flaw, using their time and money to sort out a mess that should be fixed by the company at its own expense? Now that is social engineering of highest calibre.

But no doubt loyal Apple fanbois will rejoice at having yet another opportunity to make contact with the mothership, even if it is to fix their somewhat broken smartphone. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Mobile versus security

Does the rise of BYOD and mobile devices mean firms are losing control of security?