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Apple has a secret Flash replacement plan

So it was not about HTML5 at all
Mon May 10 2010, 11:27

CLOSED SOFTWARE SELLER Apple's attack on Adobe Flash might not have been a defence of open standards or a shift to HTML5 but because it is planning to release some closed technology of its own to replace Flash.

Apple is apparently developing a software technology called Gianduia that it introduced last summer at its World of Webobjects Developer Conference.

According to AppleInsider, Jobs' Mob described the software as "a client-side, standards-based framework for rich Internet apps."

Apple has apparently been using Gianduia in several of its retail support systems, including services such as the One to One program, the Iphone reservation system, and the Concierge program for Genius Bar and Personal Shopping reservations.

Apple introduced Gianduia long before its war with Adobe kicked off. If it wanted to have a product to replace Flash then that probably was the last you would hear about it until the thing was released.

Apple has made it very clear that it opted to support HTML5, JavaScript, and CSS instead of Flash. But that might all be spin. Soon it might start pushing Gianduia instead under the pretext that HTML5 is not ready whereas Gianduia is.

Gianduia is an Italian hazelnut chocolate, which is quite appropriate for something that is at its core nutty. As proprietary software like the Vole's Silverlight, it will be a "browser-side Cocoa (including CoreData) [plus] Webobjects, written in JavaScript".

Of course bringing out a new product that will compete with Flash would be impossible unless you had mounted a huge media assault that cut the product off at the knees first. Ambitious, but given Apple's control of the media it is possible. µ

 

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