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Nvidia in talks with Global Foundries

TSMC looks on in horror
Thu Jun 18 2009, 10:10

NVIDIA CHIEF Jen-Hsun Huang has confirmed that his company is in talks with AMD spinoff fab company Global Foundries about making its GPU chips in the future.

Way back in March the INQ reported that Huang had met with GloFo's representatives. Now the Chinese site Expreview has an interview with Huang in which he's made his position clear.

"Global Foundries is a leading silicon foundry with advanced and outstanding processing technology," Huang said. "We're seriously evaluating and discussing about the possibilities of working with them."

If the deal goes through, it will mark a notable setback for Nvidia's current chipmaker, Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC). Nvidia has been upset with the chipmaker over the fab's poor yields of its GPU chips at the 40nm process node, a problem that TSMC now claims to have fixed.

Global Foundries, meanwhile, will be moving to 32nm, then to 28nm, bypassing 40nm altogether in favour of the smaller, more advanced process nodes. Huang is apparently increasingly worried that ATI could end up a generation ahead on process technology and could get better performance and economies of scale in production.

But Huang was not dismissive of TSMC, saying his firm still regards the Taiwanese fab as "a world-class silicon OEM with flexible strategies." Still, the green goblin may have considered that putting all its chips in one basket may not the best way to go.

Global Foundries' director of communications, Jon Carvill, told the INQ that his company sees "graphics as a key target market for high-volume manufacturing on advanced process nodes." He added, "Global Foundries has a proven track record of ramping complex, leading-edge processing products at mature yields."

As to Nvidia, Carvill told us his firm is looking forward "to compete for [both] AMD and NVIDIA graphics business in the future." µ

See Also
Global Foundries courts Nvidia

 

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