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Iphone software unlock finally in the wild

Carriers cry
Tue Sep 11 2007, 16:22
TODAY MARKS D-DAY for the legions of buyers keen to get their hands on an Iphone, but not so keen to sign up to two years of AT&T service - the day that the unlock hits the virtual shelves of retailers across the globe.

Iphone Sim Free, the company behind the unlock, has frustrated users over the past three weeks by demonstrating a software-based unlock - which doesn't require a user to take apart the Iphone - but then compounding delay after delay with bad communications and shadowy business practices.

However, the legions of Apple fanboys who have been taking them to task have, characteristically, changed themselves into fawning groupies as the software is distributed to Iphone users and has been proved to work in the 'real world'. The UK's very own Paul Taylor had the honour of being first man in line.

This means that any Joe can pick up an Iphone from an Apple store, run this software and plonk in a Vodafone or T-Mobile card with impunity - a kick in the teeth to the network which spent millions bending over backwards to meet Apple's specifications, not to mention the European networks still yet to launch.

The cost of the unlock - around $50 bought through a reseller - has angered those in the 'open hacking' community who have expected to see a free unlock developed by enthusiasts. They have promised to reverse engineer the Iphone Sim Free hack before the week is out and make it available for free.

Meanwhile, Apple claims to have sold its one millionth phone, keeping it on track for 10 million sales by the end of 2008.

With Iphone owners already a little 'touchy' about the new Ipod Touch, at least a carrier unlock is something to be happy about. µ

 

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