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Microsoft just ain't green enough

Says Green Party
Tue Jan 30 2007, 16:31
MICROSOFT SIMPLY ain't green enough, according to the Green Party in England and Wales.

The environmentally conscious party is accusing the vole of being irresponsible with the release of Vista, claiming that behind the gloss and shinyness the Vole has laid "hidden traps" that take away important consumer rights, not to mention forcing environmentally damaging hardware upgrades.

The Green Party reckons that users should ignore all the Vista hype and instead switch to free software. Why? Green Party bloke Derek Wall explains: "Digital rights management technology in Vista gives Microsoft the abilitiy to lock you out of your computer. Technology should increase our opportunities to consume media, create our own and share it with others."

As you're most likely aware, Vista requires fairly buff machines to handle the OS, which the party claims is forcing energy-hungry and environmentally damaging hardware upgrades on the average consumer. "Free software can run on existing hardware, reduces licensing costs for small businesses and affords important freedoms to consumers," says Derek. He reckons the UK Government should also take advantage of Open Sauce to promote free software in public bodies.

What's really miffing the party, though, is that there will be "tonnes of dumped monitors, video cards and whole computers that are perfectly capable of running Vista" minus the so-called "paranoid lock down mechanisms" that Vista forces you to use, says female principal speaker Siân Berry.

Siân adds that she believes Microsoft is "determined not to play fair," and she and her party hope that the EU will stand up to the company and it's increasing digital monopoly. µ

 

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